Can simply changing the timing of your carb intake boost your performance?

Can simply changing the timing of your carb intake boost your performance?

The Study:

Enhanced Endurance Performance by Periodization of Carbohydrate Intake: “Sleep Low” Strategy

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: April 2016 - Volume 48 - Issue 4 - p 663–672

 

 

Why You Should Care:

Something as simple as changing how you schedule your intake of daily carbohydrates can lead to significant performance gains

 

The Breakdown:

·      Researchers divided 21 triathletes into 2 groups who consumed the same daily carbohydrate intake and followed the same training program

 

·      Group One trained with no restrictions on when they consumed their carbohydrates

 

·      Group Two trained with high carbohydrate availability before and during their evening session but limited their carbohydrate availability overnite as well as prior and during their morning training session

 

·      The results revealed “significant improvements in submaximal cycling capacity, as well as supramaximal cycling capacity and 10-km running time” of Group Two

 

What It Means For You:

·         Something as simple as “short term periodization” aka changing the timing of your carbohydrate intake can lead to improved times on the race course.  

Is exercise BETTER than surgery for your knee problems

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Is exercise BETTER than surgery for your knee problems

The Study:

Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients: randomised controlled trial with two year follow-up

Nina Jullum Kise, et al.

BMJ 2016;354:i3740

 

Why You Should Care:

·         By some estimates, 75% of adults over 40 years of age have degenerative meniscal tears

·         Approximately 2 million people undergo arthroscopic knee surgery a year. 

·         Evidence is mounting that for many people, surgery offers little to no benefit

The Breakdown:

·         Researchers divided 140 adults into 2 groups.  1 group underwent arthroscopic surgery,             the other group underwent a 12 week at-home exercise program

·         There was no clinically relevant in knee function difference at 2 years.

·         There was greater muscle strength in the exercise group at 3 months and 12 months

What It Means For You:

·         Exercise therapy appears to be the superior choice to arthroscopic surgery for                            degenerative meniscal  tears

References:

Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients: randomised controlled trial with two year follow-up

Nina Jullum Kise, et al.

BMJ 2016;354:i3740

Degenerative meniscus tears and mobility impairment in women with knee osteoarthritis

Lange, A.K. et al.

Osteoarthritis and Cartilage , Volume 15 , Issue 6 , 701 – 708

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Don't let a vitamin deficiency ruin your next PR

Don't let a vitamin deficiency ruin your next PR

The Study:

Association of Vitamin D With Stress Fractures: A Retrospective Cohort Study

J Foot Ankle Surg. 2016;55:117-120.

Why You Should Care:

Nothing can ruin a race season quicker than a stress fracture.  Every athlete has either had one or knows someone who has.  They start as a nagging pain that won’t go away and wind up as six weeks of interrupted training and your planned PR down the drain.

The Breakdown:

  • The researchers reviewed the records of 53 patients who had been diagnosed with a stress fracture in the last 3 months.  44 of the patients had a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level <40mg/ml
  • The researchers concluded “an association was seen in patients with stress fractures and a serum 25 (OH) D levels <40mg/ml
  • The researchers proposed that “greater that previously understood serum concentrations of Vitamin D might be necessary to prevent stress fractures in active individuals.

What It Means For You:

  • Stress fractures are a common injury that occurs when stress on a bone exceeds its capacity to withstand those forces.
  • Evidence links insufficient levels of Vitamin D to stress fractures
  • Researchers recommend a minimum serum Vitamin D level to prevent stress fractures
  • The only way to determine your level is adequate is to see your Health Care Provider and confirm it with a blood test.